Boiled Linseed Oil

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A penetrating surface sealer that water proofs and protects

  • Common name(s): Linseed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Hard Oil, Drying Oil
  • UN Number: N/A
  • Code: BO

Boiled Linseed Oil Common Uses

  • Restores and enhances natural wood.
  • Penetrating surface sealer that Polishes, Varnishes, Lubricates & Protects.
  • Slows down water penetration in wood in low-moisture areas.
  • Used on wooden: Furniture, Doors, Floor Surfaces, Tool handles, Gun stocks.
  • May be used as an additive in oil-base paints particularly artist’s colours to increase gloss.
  • Commonly used as a polish to maintain oiled wood and natural finishes. A 40% Boiled Linseed Oil, 60% Mineral Turpentine blend wiped over indoor wooden furniture can enhance & improve its appearance. Repeat as needed every 6 - 8 weeks.
  • Boiled Linseed Oil is treated with effective drying agents, which ensures quick drying time & reduces the possibility of a sticky finish. Raw Linseed Oil is mainly for outdoor use & Boiled Linseed Oil is mainly used indoors.
  • Boiled Linseed Oil is not suitable to feed horses as it is solvent extracted and has drying agents added to it. Raw Linseed Oil is cold pressed and is suitable to feed horses.
  • Provides a light golden stain for wood such as pine.
  • Boiled Linseed Oil is excellent for finishing and maintaining wooden furniture and wood floors. Mixing Linseed Oil with Pure Turpentine (2/3 Linseed Oil to 1/3 Pure Turpentine) creates an “Oiled Finish” on fine furniture and wood panelling and a durable finish that does not need waxing. Linseed Oil penetrates into the wood and creates a water and alcohol resistant surface without altering the natural colour of the wood when dry.
  • Traditional wood finish and preservative, processed to dry faster than Raw Linseed Oil. May be used as an additive for oil-base paints particularly artist’s colours to increase gloss.

Linseed Oils

Linseed Oils are obtained from the seeds of the flax plant and it is one of the most useful natural oils. Before modern preservatives and synthetics, they were commonly used as a stand-alone preservative for wood, natural hemp rope, masonry, as a conditioner for natural boar’s hair paint brushes and as an additive for oil paints. It was also valuable as a furniture finish and for wood floors. The addition of solvents such as Mineral Turpentine speed Linseed Oil’s drying time, making the Linseed Oil less viscous and helping the mixture penetrate deeper into the timber, making it an even more useful product. Linseed Oil does not “dry” like water or turpentine. It does not evaporate or disappear, instead when spread in a thin layer and exposed to air, it gels to a soft finish. When rubbed into wood, it fills the pores with a thin protective film. It is used as a preservative for wood, concrete, and an ingredient in paints, varnishes, stains, soaps, and inks. Linseed Oil is a common carrier used in oil paint. It can also be used as a painting medium, making oil paints more fluid, transparent and glossy.

Which is the right Linseed Oil for the job: Raw or Boiled?

Raw Linseed Oil is oil squeezed from flax seed and packaged with no additional additives or preservatives. Raw Linseed Oil dries very slowly, taking weeks to fully cure. You should limit its use to the insides of wood gutters, chopping blocks, sawhorses, and other items exposed to the elements where drying time is not a consideration. Slow drying is a mixed blessing. For oil-based paints slow drying is a benefit, since this allows the paint to “level” itself, giving a smoother finish with fewer brush marks. The best looking paint jobs are invariably oil paint jobs. However, when used as a wood preservative for items that are handled or walked on, such as tool handles, furniture, or wood decks, long drying times are undesirable, so Boiled Linseed Oil should be used.

Boiled Linseed Oil is not boiled.

Although boiling of some oils changes their drying characteristics, with Linseed Oil it is the addition of certain solvents and driers that causes Linseed Oil to dry more quickly, acting as if it were boiled. This makes it a better product for preserving tool handles, decks, and furniture. Boiled Linseed Oil is treated with effective drying agents, which ensures quick drying time and reduces the possibility of a sticky finish. In shaded areas, treat the wood with wood preservative before applying Boiled Linseed Oil because oil-treated wood can develop mould.

Modified Linseed Oils

Heat-treated Linseed Oil is thicker and dries very slowly. This grade of Linseed Oil is usually labelled as “polymerized” or “stand” oil. NOTE: Rags soaked in Linseed Oil are dangerous if left in a pile as spontaneous combustion may occur. That means that a chemical reaction creates heat and the rags can begin to smoulder and burst into flame. All oil-soaked rags should be washed immediately or disposed of in a container of water and detergent. For temporary storage, dampen rag and hang flat, not crumpled in a wad.

Miscellaneous Uses for Linseed Oils:

Antique Furniture Refinishing:

Boiled Linseed Oil is the ideal medium for refinishing antiques or for giving new unfinished furniture that “hand-rubbed” oil finish. If the finish is badly scratched or worn it is preferable to remove the old finish with varnish remover. Covering with wet blotting paper and applying a hot household iron may remove dents. Sandpaper rough spots. Apply Boiled Linseed Oil generously with a brush. Let the oil soak into the wood for 30 minutes before removing the excess with a soft cloth. Finally rub the surface well with a clean, soft cloth and repeat the process in 24 hours. Continue applications in the same fashion until the wood has acquired a beautiful, deep lustre. Five or six applications are usually sufficient; the degree of gloss depends on the time spent on rubbing, which should be progressively increased with each coat. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

To Renew Shellac Surfaces:

Is that Old French polish finish on your furniture showing signs of age and wear? Try this tip. Saturate a cloth with Boiled Linseed Oil. Next sprinkle a small amount of pumice stone powder on the cloth and then rub the surface with long strokes. Try to make your strokes run off the end of the surface if possible and when working on round surfaces use a continuous circular motion. Wipe off any excess with a clean cloth. If necessary, repeat using a finer grade of pumice stone powder mixed with Boiled Linseed Oil and finally again rub with a clean cloth, removing all excess oil. The Boiled Linseed Oil lubricates the pumice, preventing scratching. Never use water with the pumice powder. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Untreated Furniture:

If new timber is to be treated, it is preferable to first raise the short fibres, which are inevitably present, by dampening the surface with water and allowing to dry. The surface should then be sanded with a fine sand-paper and the grain filled by applying a wood filler, according to the manufacturer’s directions. After a fine sanding the timber is ready for the oil finish, as previously described. For a light-coloured finish use Boiled Linseed Oil. Besides the natural wood finish given by Boiled Linseed Oil, other advantages are apparent. As the oil is rubbed off between coats, the surface is left non tacky and therefore non dust attracting. When marred, the finish can be easily renewed, because the oils are actually rubbed into the timber and good protection is achieved. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Furniture Polish:

Linseed oils make an excellent furniture polish, Mix two parts of Boiled Linseed Oil or Raw Linseed Oil with one part of Mineral Turpentine. A polish made in this way from Linseed Oil cleans as it renews the surface in one economical, timesaving operation. The need for detergents is eliminated and most important, this polish is wax free and will give you no trouble if you wish to refinish or paint your furniture at a later date. The advantage of this polish is it actually ties to the surface and leaves a clear, smooth, long-lasting finish that is resistant to water and wear. To apply Linseed Oil polish, moisten a soft cloth with the mixture and rub briskly. Using a clean cloth, remove excess polish and rub until the surface is finger-touch dry. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Timber Flooring:

For a most attractive finish, have your timber floors fine-sanded and then treat them with Boiled Linseed Oil. For hardwood, mix two parts of Boiled Linseed Oil with one part of Mineral Turpentine. For softwoods, use three parts of Boiled Linseed Oil with one part of Mineral Turpentine. Brush on a coat of the required mixture and rub in well with a cloth, working in small sections at a time. After an hour, wipe off all surplus oil with a clean cloth. Allow 24 hours to dry thoroughly and repeat the process three times. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Sticking doors and windows:

Doors and windows usually stick because moisture enters raw edges, causing warping and swelling. If you are not quite ready to get on with that re-paint job, why not give them a thin coat of 2:1 mixture of Boiled Linseed Oil and Mineral Turpentine? Allow 24 to 48 hours to dry before using. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Drawers Sticking:

You can help prevent wooden drawers and runners from sticking and wearing by coating the unpainted timber with a 2:1 mixture of Boiled Linseed Oil and Mineral Turpentine. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Protecting Stair Threads and Risers:

Stair threads and risers are often scuffed and marred. They may be protected by rubbing with a light coat of two parts Boiled Linseed Oil to one part Mineral Turpentine. If this treatment is repeated every few months they will retain their beauty. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Warping of timber in furniture:

If you’re a handyman and make your own furniture, try this tip to minimise warping. Very often when making furniture, the home handyman thinks only of the outward appearance and leaves inside wooden surfaces untreated. If you give the unpainted inside of your furniture one or two light coats of 2:1 Boiled Linseed Oil : Mineral Turpentine mixture, the surface will be sealed and will effectively prevent the absorption of moisture and thus minimise warping. As Boiled Linseed Oil contains special driers, the furniture will be ready to use in about 48 hours. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Chrome fittings:

Such as car trimmings, bumper bars, household taps etc, should be thoroughly cleaned and rubbed with a mixture of equal parts of Boiled Linseed Oil and Mineral Turpentine. Finally polish with a clean soft cloth. This will keep the chrome clean longer and protect it from corrosion and rust. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Insect Screens:

Wipe the screen mesh down several times a year with a cloth soaked in Boiled Linseed Oil and Mineral Turpentine mixed in equal parts. Remove excess oil with a clean cloth. For best results, use this preparation when the screens are new and you will be surprised how much longer they will last. Do not carry out this treatment on a dusty day. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Brickwork:

Here’s a trick that works wonders for interior brickwork. First clean the bricks thoroughly and then apply a thin coat of 2:1 mixture of Boiled Linseed Oil and Mineral Turpentine. This gives the brickwork an attractive easy-to-dust glossy finish. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Benches & Bench Blocks:

Unfinished benches, bench blocks and ‘shooting’ boards and hand tools will remain smooth and last longer if you give them a natural wood finish with one or two coats of Boiled or Raw Linseed Oil. When you buy a new hammer, chisel, spade or any other household or garden tool, treat the wooden handle with a thin coat of Boiled Linseed Oil, allowing to soak in and removing all excess with a clean cloth. Axe and pick handles etc, should be soaked in Raw Linseed Oil when new. While you’re on the job, why not give all the steel sections of your tools a thin coating of Linseed Oil? Treat regularly to prevent rust. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Stiff Putty:

If your oil-based glazing putty is getting a little stiff, or if seems too dry, add a very small amount of Boiled Linseed Oil and mix thoroughly. If the putty is dried and lumpy, you won’t be able to totally restore it by adding linseed oil as it will still retain some lumps. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Re-glazing Windows:

Remove broken glass from the sash and chip off old putty. Remove holding pins and scrape the wood where the new glass is to rest. The wood should then be given a coat of Boiled or Raw Linseed Oil. This keeps the oil in the putty from being absorbed, preventing it from drying out and crumbling. Spread a thin coat of putty about 1.5 mm thick in the sash to form a bed. Then press the new glass gently into position and hold in place with glazier’s points or small de-headed brads. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Nails & Screws:

Here’s a tip for driving nails the easy way. Dip them in Raw Linseed Oil! Surprisingly enough, this treatment also keeps nails from bending. Also helps to prevent wood rot and corrosion of the nails. You will find it easier to drive screws into wood if you treat them in the same manner. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Wooden Ladders:

Give your ladders or wooden strips a coating of Raw Linseed Oil and this will keep them in first-class condition. Repeat annually. This will maintain flexibility and at the same time will not hide any defects. This is the best safety precaution you can take. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Paint brushes:

Soak your new brush in Raw Linseed Oil for 24 hours before using. This is recommended by leading brush manufacturers and will improve the efficiency of your brush, holding the paint better and giving smoother application. After using, clean the brush and suspend in Raw Linseed Oil until again needed. Drill a hole in the handle of the brush and insert a length of wire. Rest this wire on the sides of your container of Linseed Oil and the brush will be suspended and the bristles kept straight. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Garden Pruning Shrubs and Trees:

Any gardener will know that the sap runs from many trees and shrubs when they are pruned. Try this effective treatment when next you’re pruning. Warm two parts Lanolin with one part of Raw Linseed Oil and mix well. This helps to seal the cut. The same preparation may be used on damaged or broken limbs. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Farm Uses:

The uses are many and varied. For protection and preservation use Linseed Oils on the following: Combine platforms, cultivation shovels, discs, posts, pig troughs, truck tables and wooden silos to mention a few. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Cricket Bats, Baseball Bats, Hockey Sticks, Archery Equipment, Croquet Mallets:

To give added “life” to sporting equipment, rub in three or four coats of Raw Linseed Oil, allowing 48 hours between applications. Repeat with a single application each season. It is important to keep the Linseed Oil away from the “spring” of cricket bats. New cricket bats are coated with Linseed Oil and knocked to perfection so they last longer. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Wooden Boats and Canoes:

Use a cloth to apply Boiled Linseed Oil to worn spots. The oil penetrates deep into the wood and helps prevent rot. Remove the excess and allow to dry before using. Oars and paddles last longer and have more spring when wiped occasionally with Boiled Linseed Oil. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Fishing Rods and Gun Stocks:

Preserve and beautify the finish of your bamboo, wood or steel fishing rod by giving the Boiled Linseed Oil treatment. It will protect the metal work on your expensive casting reel too. For ordinary care, many riflemen apply a small amount to the stock after the day’s shoot, wiping-off excess to a finger-touch dry. (Note - Soak used Linseed Oil rags in water & detergent to avoid a potential fire through spontaneous combustion)

Use Raw Linseed Oil if a slower drying product is required.

See Also Raw Linseed Oil.

Also Available in 500mls.

Note we are also bulk Boiled Linseed Oil suppliers in New Zealand.

Customers who buy Boiled Linseed Oil are advised to download and read the Material Safety Data Sheet below.
Boiled Linseed Oil sold in: 1 Litre, 2 Litre, 4 Litre, 20 Litre, 60 Litre and 200 Litre Drums.

Download Boiled Linseed Oil MSDS

Boiled Linseed Oil
available in

  • 1L
  • 2L
  • 4L
  • 20L
  • 60L
  • 208L

Other sizes and contract packing also available, please enquire.